Divorce Statistics UK 2020

Over the past 50 years, exactly one third of divorces have ended in divorce. We've analysed Office for National statistics data to find out how divorce rates have changed over the past 20 years and how they vary by age group. Read on to find out the average age of men and women when they get divorced, and the worst years to have gotten married according to divorce stats. To read about how much a divorce will cost, see our article on the average cost of a divorce.

Divorce Rate

The average overall divorce rate in England and Wales is 33.3%, based on all marriages over the past 50+ years between 1964 to 2017. However, the rate changes according to how many years a couple has been together.

For example, of couples who married 50 years ago in 1967, only 31.9% had ended in divorce by 2017. In contrast, 43.6% of those marrying in 1987 had divorced by 2017. And 20.1% of couples married ten years ago had divorced by 2017.

Divorce Rates in 2017Cumulative Divorce Rate
50 years of marriage31.9%
40 years of marriage39.8%
30 years of marriage43.6%
20 years of marriage37.2%
10 years of marriage20.1%
Overall33.3%
Chart showing cumulative divorce rates by year of marriage
Marriages in 1987 have the highest cumulative divorce rate

Changing Divorce Rates

The divorce rate has certainly changed over the years, especially for longer marriages. The chart below shows how divorce rates for those married 10, 20 and 30 years has changed over the past 30 years. As you can see, the same proportion of marriages are failing by 10 years (low 20%s), but there's a much higher proportion of marriages failing by 30 years (24.9% in 1987 vs. 43.6% in 2017).

Chart showing how divorce rates have changed
Divorce rates over the past 25 years

Number of Divorces

In 2017, there were 102,007 divorces in England and Wales—101,669 were opposite-sex divorces and 338 were of same-sex couples. This is a decrease of 38% since 1993, the year with the largest number of divorces, when a whopping 165,018 marriages ended by divorce.

Stats on Number of Divorces
Year with the most divorces1993 (165,018 divorces)
Number of divorces 2017102,007 (101,669 opposite sex, 338 same sex)
Percentage drop in divorces from 1993 to 201738%
Chart showing number of UK divorces over time
The number of couples getting divorced is steadily declining

However, that's not the whole story. While the number of divorces has been steadily dropping, so has the number of couples getting married. The year with the highest number of marriages was 1972, when 426,241 couples said, "I do." By 2016, that number had dropped to 249,793—a decrease of 41.4%.

Chart showing number of UK marriages and divorces over time
The number of couples getting divorced is declining, but so is the number of marriages

Divorce Rates by Age

Divorce rates for young people in particular have dropped since 1993, the year with the highest number of divorces in England and Wales. Around 3% of couples under the age of 35 ended in divorce during 1993—in the year 2017 this number had dropped to around 1%.

Proportion of marriages ending in divorce in 1993 vs. 2017, by age19932017
Under 201.1%0.1%
20 to 243.1%1.0%
25 to 293.3%1.2%
30 to 342.9%1.2%
35 to 392.4%1.2%
40 to 441.8%1.3%
45 to 491.3%1.3%
50 to 540.9%1.0%
55 to 590.5%0.7%
60 and over0.1%0.2%
Chart showing how divorce rates by age have changed
The divorce rate for young people in particular has dropped over the past 25 years

Number of Divorces by Age

The average age for divorce is 46.4 for men and 43.9 for women. Similarly, those age 45 to 49 years old have the most divorces.

Number of Divorces by Age, 2017MenWomen
Under 2018
20 to 24304949
25 to 293,9006,689
30 to 3410,58413,415
35 to 3913,97915,609
40 to 4414,98115,373
45 to 4916,82816,048
50 to 5414,41012,881
55 to 599,5007,326
60 and over9,8316,227
Chart showing number of UK divorces over time
The number of couples getting divorced is steadily declining

Causes of Divorce

Unreasonable behaviour is the most common cause of divorce in England and Wales, accounting for nearly half of all divorces. In 2017, 46.5% of divorces were caused by unreasonable behaviour. The second most common reason that couples divorce is after a 2 year separation with consent. Adultery was the cause of 10.5% of divorces.

Cause of Divorce in England and WalesPercent of Divorces
Unreasonable behaviour46.5%
2 year Separation with consent26.7%
5 year Separation (no consent)15.4%
Adultery10.5%
Combo (adultery and unreasonable behaviour)0.5%
Desertion0.5%
Chart showing major causes of divorce in the UK
Most divorces result from unreasonable behaviour

Worst Marriage Years for Divorces?

Couples who tied the knot in 1987 have the highest cumulative divorce rate, with 44% of these marriages ending in divorce by 2017. However it's not a surprise that the cumulative divorce rate is lower for more recent marriage years, as they've had fewer years of accumulated divorces. Since the cumulative rate so far has peaked for those married in 1987, it's safe to say that the worst year to get married was 1987—if you married before 1988.

Chart showing cumulative divorce rates by year of marriage
Marriages in 1987 have the highest cumulative divorce rate

Another way to measure the worst year for marriages is looking at the average annual divorce rate for each marriage year. This measure is calculated by dividing the cumulative divorce rates in the chart above by the number of years of marriage that have passed. By this measure, those married in 2003 and 2004 have had the highest average divorce rate per year—with 2.06% of people married in 2003 and '04 divorcing each year since their nuptials. So while 1987 first looks like the worst year to get married, it seems that the cumulative divorce rate for those married in 2003 and '04 will catch up and perhaps surpass the rate for those married in 1987 given more time.

Fewer couples divorce in the early years, which is why the chart tails off abruptly for recent marriages.

Chart showing average annual divorce rates by year of marriage
Marriages in 2003 and 2004 have the highest average annual divorce rate

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